Museum Artifacts

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Grade Range:
K-12
Resource Type(s):
Artifacts, Primary Sources
Date Posted:
5/3/2012
This apparatus was designed by Catherine Stern, a physicist by training and the founder of a Montessori school in her native Germany. Stern and her husband were of Jewish descent, and emigrated to New York City in 1938 to avoid persecution by the Nazis. There she developed these materials, descri
Grade Range:
K-12
Resource Type(s):
Artifacts, Primary Sources
Date Posted:
3/28/2012
This "Solar System" quilt was made by Ellen Harding Baker of Cedar County, Iowa, in 1876. The wool top of this applique quilt is embellished with wool-fabric applique, wool braid, and wool and silk embroidery. Included in the design is the appliqued inscription, "Solar System," and the embroidere
Grade Range:
K-12
Resource Type(s):
Artifacts, Primary Sources
Date Posted:
3/27/2012
In the early nineteenth century, lighthouses in the United States were considered inferior to those in France and England. American mariners complained about the quality of the light emanating from local lighthouse towers, arguing that European lighthouses were more effective at shining bright be
Grade Range:
K-12
Resource Type(s):
Artifacts, Primary Sources
Date Posted:
3/23/2012
This is a set of eight "dropping sticks" used to teach acoustics. It was made in Paris by the famous scientific instrument maker Rudolph Koenig, sometime between 1858 and 1902. This particular set was used in the introductory physics class of the Worcester Polytechnic Institute. These s
Grade Range:
9-12
Resource Type(s):
Artifacts, Primary Sources
Date Posted:
3/22/2012
The individual identified in Japanese characters, here is, Michibiku Ozamoto, or, in English, T. Ozamoto. The numbers 24-4-3 stand for Block 24, Barracks 4, Apartment 3.
Grade Range:
K-12
Resource Type(s):
Artifacts, Primary Sources
Date Posted:
3/22/2012
Born in New Orleans in 1901, jazz musician Louis Armstrong (d. 1971)was known for his distinctive trumpet-playing and vocal style. He often improvised jazz riffs using his voice rather than his instrument, “scatting” notes and melodies rather than singing actual words. Armstrong transformed t
Grade Range:
9-12
Resource Type(s):
Artifacts, Primary Sources
Date Posted:
3/22/2012
During the Great Depression, government photographer Dorothea Lange took this picture at a migrant farmworkers' camp near Nipomo, California. Lange's brief caption recorded her impressions of the family's plight: "Destitute pea pickers ... a 32-year-old mother of seven children." F
Grade Range:
K-12
Resource Type(s):
Artifacts, Primary Sources
Date Posted:
3/12/2012
In 1976, computer pioneers Steve Wozniak and Steve Jobs began selling their Apple I computer in kit form to computer stores. A month later, Wozniak was working on a design for an improved version, the Apple II. They demonstrated a prototype in December, and then introduced it to the public in Apr
Grade Range:
K-12
Resource Type(s):
Artifacts, Primary Sources
Date Posted:
3/12/2012
This red knit cardigan was worn by Fred Rogers, creator and host of the children's program, Mister Rogers' Neighborhood (PBS, 1968-2001). For more than thirty years, Rogers began each episode by changing into a sweater and tennis shoes and singing, "Won't you be my neighbor?" An o
Grade Range:
K-12
Resource Type(s):
Artifacts, Primary Sources
Date Posted:
3/12/2012
Sixteen-year-old Judy Garland wore these sequined shoes as Dorothy Gale in the 1939 film classic The Wizard of Oz. In the original book by L. Frank Baum, Dorothy's magic slippers are silver; for the Technicolor movie, they were changed to ruby red to show up more vividly against the yell
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