Interactive Gettysburg Address

Grade Range: 4-12
Resource Type(s): Primary Sources, Interactives & Media, Lessons & Activities
Date Posted: 1/22/2009

Use this interactive document to bring one of the five known handwritten copies of the Gettysburg Address to life! Students can zoom in on the document, click on highlighted passages that help put the famous speech into context and listen to actor Liam Neeson read the entire address. Transcripts of the manuscript are also available in English and Spanish to help students understand one the most famous speeches in American History. This resource is included in the online exhibition entitled The Gettysburg Address.

National Standards

Historical Thinking Standards (Grades K-4)

Standards in History (Grades K-4)

United States History Standards (Grades 5-12)

Historical Thinking Standards (Grades 5-12)

Common Core State Standards (Grades K-12)

CCR Anchor Standards for Writing

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.W.1 (Text Types and Purposes): Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.W.2 (Text Types and Purposes): Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.W.3 (Text Types and Purposes): Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details and well-structured event sequences.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.W.4 (Production and Distribution of Writing): Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.W.5 (Production and Distribution of Writing): Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.W.6 (Production and Distribution of Writing): Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and to interact and collaborate with others.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.W.7 (Research to Build and Present Knowledge): Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects based on focused questions, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.W.8 (Research to Build and Present Knowledge): Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, assess the credibility and accuracy of each source, and integrate the information while avoiding plagiarism.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.W.9 (Research to Build and Present Knowledge): Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.W.10 (Range of Writing): Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences.

Common Core State Standards (Grades 6-8)

Literacy in History/Social Studies (Grades 6-8)

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.6-8.1 (Key Ideas and Details): Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.6-8.2 (Key Ideas and Details): Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary of the source distinct from prior knowledge or opinions.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.6-8.3 (Key Ideas and Details): Identify key steps in a text's description of a process related to history/social studies (e.g., how a bill becomes law, how interest rates are raised or lowered).
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.6-8.4 (Craft and Structure): Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including vocabulary specific to domains related to history/social studies.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.6-8.5 (Craft and Structure): Describe how a text presents information (e.g., sequentially, comparatively, causally).
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.6-8.6 (Craft and Structure): Identify aspects of a text that reveal an author's point of view or purpose (e.g., loaded language, inclusion or avoidance of particular facts).
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.6-8.7 (Integration of Knowledge and Ideas): Integrate visual information (e.g., in charts, graphs, photographs, videos, or maps) with other information in print and digital texts.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.6-8.8 (Integration of Knowledge and Ideas): Distinguish among fact, opinion, and reasoned judgment in a text.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.6-8.9 (Integration of Knowledge and Ideas): Analyze the relationship between a primary and secondary source on the same topic.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.6-8.10 (Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity): By the end of grade 8, read and comprehend history/social studies texts in the grades 6-8 text complexity band independently and proficiently.

Common Core State Standards (Grades 9-10)

Literacy in History/Social Studies (Grades 9-10)

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.9-10.1 (Key Ideas and Details): Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, attending to such features as the date and origin of the information.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.9-10.2 (Key Ideas and Details): Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary of how key events or ideas develop over the course of the text.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.9-10.3 (Key Ideas and Details): Analyze in detail a series of events described in a text; determine whether earlier events caused later ones or simply preceded them.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.9-10.4 (Craft and Structure): Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including vocabulary describing political, social, or economic aspects of history/social science.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.9-10.5 (Craft and Structure): Analyze how a text uses structure to emphasize key points or advance an explanation or analysis.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.9-10.6 (Craft and Structure): Compare the point of view of two or more authors for how they treat the same or similar topics, including which details they include and emphasize in their respective accounts.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.9-10.7 (Integration of Knowledge and Ideas): Integrate quantitative or technical analysis (e.g., charts, research data) with qualitative analysis in print or digital text.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.9-10.8 (Integration of Knowledge and Ideas): Assess the extent to which the reasoning and evidence in a text support the author's claims.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.9-10.9 (Integration of Knowledge and Ideas): Compare and contrast treatments of the same topic in several primary and secondary sources.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.9-10.10 (Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity)

Common Core State Standards (Grades 11-12)

Literacy in History/Social Studies (Grades 11-12)

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.1 (Key Ideas and Details): Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, connecting insights gained from specific details to an understanding of the text as a whole.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.2 (Key Ideas and Details): Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary that makes clear the relationships among the key details and ideas.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.3 (Key Ideas and Details): Evaluate various explanations for actions or events and determine which explanation best accords with textual evidence, acknowledging where the text leaves matters uncertain.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.4 (Craft and Structure): Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including analyzing how an author uses and refines the meaning of a key term over the course of a text (e.g., how Madison defines faction in Federalist No. 10).
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.5 (Craft and Structure): Analyze in detail how a complex primary source is structured, including how key sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text contribute to the whole.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.6 (Craft and Structure): Evaluate authors' differing points of view on the same historical event or issue by assessing the authors' claims, reasoning, and evidence.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.7 (Integration of Knowledge and Ideas): Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., visually, quantitatively, as well as in words) in order to address a question or solve a problem.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.8 (Integration of Knowledge and Ideas): Evaluate an author's premises, claims, and evidence by corroborating or challenging them with other information.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.9 (Integration of Knowledge and Ideas): Integrate information from diverse sources, both primary and secondary, into a coherent understanding of an idea or event, noting discrepancies among sources.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.10 (Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity): By the end of grade 12, read and comprehend history/social studies texts in the grades 11-CCR text complexity band independently and proficiently.

College, Career, and Civic Life (C3) Framework for Social Studies State Standards (Grades K-2)

2: Applying Disciplinary Tools and Concepts

D2.Civ.1.K-2. (Civics): Describe roles and responsibilities of people in authority.
D2.Civ.2.K-2. (Civics): Explain how all people, not just official leaders, play important roles in a community.
D2.Civ.3.K-2. (Civics): Explain the need for and purposes of rules in various settings inside and outside of school.
D2.Civ.5.K-2. (Civics): Explain what governments are and some of their functions.
D2.Civ.6.K-2. (Civics): Describe how communities work to accomplish common tasks, establish responsibilities, and fulfill roles of authority.
D2.Civ.7.K-2. (Civics): Apply civic virtues when participating in school settings.
D2.Civ.8.K-2. (Civics): Describe democratic principles such as equality, fairness, and respect for legitimate authority and rules.
D2.Civ.9.K-2 (Civics): Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions while responding attentively to others when addressing ideas and making decisions as a group.
D2.Civ.10.K-2. (Civics): Compare their own point of view with others' perspectives.
D2.Civ.11.K-2. (Civics): Explain how people can work together to make decisions in the classroom.
D2.Civ.12.K-2. (Civics): Identify and explain how rules function in public (classroom and school) settings.
D2.Civ.14.K-2. (Civics): Describe how people have tried to improve their communities over time.
D2.Eco.1.K-2. (Economics): Explain how scarcity necessitates decision making.
D2.Eco.2.K-2. (Economics): Identify the benefits and costs of making various personal decisions.
D2.Eco.3.K-2. (Economics): Describe the skills and knowledge required to produce certain goods and services.
D2.Eco.4.K-2. (Economics): Describe the goods and services that people in the local community produce and those that are produced in other communities.
D2.Eco.5.K-2. (Economics): Identify prices of products in a local market.
D2.Eco.6.K-2. (Economics): Explain how people earn income.
D2.Eco.7.K-2. (Economics): Describe examples of costs of production.
D2.Eco.9.K-2. (Economics): Describe the role of banks in an economy.
D2.Eco.10.K-2. (Economics): Explain why people save.
D2.Eco.12.K-2. (Economics): Describe examples of the goods and services that governments provide.
D2.Eco.13.K-2. (Economics): Describe examples of capital goods and human capital.
D2.Eco.14.K-2. (Economics): Describe why people in one country trade goods and services with people in other countries.
D2.Eco.15.K-2. (Economics): Describe products that are produced abroad and sold domestically and products that are produced domestically and sold abroad.
D2.Geo.1.K-2. (Geography): Construct maps, graphs, and other representations of familiar places.
D2.Geo.2.K-2. (Geography): Use maps, graphs, photographs, and other representations to describe places and the relationships and interactions that shape them.
D2.Geo.3.K-2. (Geography): Use maps, globes, and other simple geographic models to identify cultural and environmental characteristics of places.
D2.Geo.4.K-2. (Geography): Explain how weather, climate, and other environmental characteristics affect people's lives in a place or region.
D2.Geo.5.K-2. (Geography): Describe how human activities affect the cultural and environmental characteristics of places or regions.
D2.Geo.6.K-2. (Geography): Identify some cultural and environmental characteristics of specific places.
D2.Geo.7.K-2. (Geography): Explain why and how people, goods, and ideas move from place to place.
D2.Geo.8.K-2. (Geography): Compare how people in different types of communities use local and distant environments to meet their daily needs.
D2.Geo.9.K-2. (Geography): Describe the connections between the physical environment of a place and the economic activities found there.
D2.Geo.10.K-2.(Geography): Describe changes in the physical and cultural characteristics of various world regions.
D2.Geo.11.K-2. (Geography): Explain how the consumption of products connects people to distant places.
D2.Geo.12.K-2. (Geography): Identify ways that a catastrophic disaster may affect people living in a place.
D2.His.1.K-2. (History): Create a chronological sequence of multiple events.
D2.His.2.K-2.(History): Compare life in the past to life today.
D2.His.3.K-2. (History): Generate questions about individuals and groups who have shaped a significant historical change.
D2.His.4.K-2. (History): Compare perspectives of people in the past to those of people in the present.
D2.His.6.K-2 (History): Compare different accounts of the same historical event.
D2.His.9.K-2. (History): Identify different kinds of historical sources.
D2.His.10.K-2. (History): Explain how historical sources can be used to study the past.
D2.His.11.K-2. (History): Identify the maker, date, and place of origin for a historical source from information within the source itself.
D2.His.12.K-2. (History): Generate questions about a particular historical source as it relates to a particular historical event or development.
D2.His.14.K-2. (History): Generate possible reasons for an event or development in the past.
D2.His.16.K-2. (History): Select which reasons might be more likely than others to explain a historical event or development.

Instructional Strategies