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History Explorer Results (116)
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Grade Range:
5-12
Resource Type(s):
Reviewed Websites
Date Posted:
8/6/2009
This website, from the New York Historical Society, is a collection of two special exhibitions focused on slavery in antebellum New York.  Both sites offer students interpretation of the people, places, and documents that define New York’s experience with slavery, culminating in New York
Grade Range:
3-12
Resource Type(s):
Reference Materials
Date Posted:
6/17/2009
This online exhibition focuses on the natural history specimens that were collected by Lewis and Clark on their historic expedition. The site contains images of museum specimens, scientific drawings, and field photos of the plant and animal species observed and described by Lewis and Clark, along
Grade Range:
5-12
Resource Type(s):
Reviewed Websites
Date Posted:
6/17/2009
This website, produced by the Missouri Historical Society, was produced to coincide with a traveling exhibition celebrating the bicentennial of the Lewis and Clark exhibition.  Students can explore the entire journey of Lewis and Clark and the Corps of Discovery through the use of an interac
Grade Range:
5-12
Resource Type(s):
Artifacts, Primary Sources
Date Posted:
6/10/2009
By the late 19th century, the United States had established itself as a world leader in the area of civil engineering. Perhaps no project better symbolized America's technical prowess than the awe-inspiring Brooklyn Bridge, which connected the nation's largest and third largest cities—New York
Grade Range:
K-12
Resource Type(s):
Artifacts, Primary Sources
Date Posted:
6/4/2009
The Battle of the Sewing Machines" was composed and arranged by F. Hyde for the piano, and was published in 1874 by Wm. A. Pond & Co. of 547 Broadway, N.Y., N.Y. The lithograph by R. Teller of 120 Wooster St., N.Y., N.Y., illustrates a "battle" of sewing machines. The Remington "army" is marc
Grade Range:
4-12
Resource Type(s):
Reference Materials
Date Posted:
6/4/2009
The focus of this online exhibition is the history of mathematics education in America.  Beginning with the advent of public education in the early nineteenth century and ending in the modern Information Age, students will learn how advances in technology and changes in education theory have
Grade Range:
K-12
Resource Type(s):
Artifacts, Primary Sources
Date Posted:
3/10/2009
Daguerreotype of Unitarian Congregational Church, New York City. On the Washington Square campus of the New York University, Samuel F.B. Morse and Dr. John W. Draper operated together one of the first American photographic studios for a short time, from 1839 to the early 1840s. Collaborating on t
Grade Range:
K-12
Resource Type(s):
Artifacts, Primary Sources
Date Posted:
3/10/2009
This Mercury fuming box for developing daguerreotypes is certainly among the earliest photographic equipment used in America, dating 1839-1840. Working closely with Dr. J.W. Draper in New York, Morse was instrumental in promoting photography in America, furthering experimentation, and producing e
Grade Range:
K-12
Resource Type(s):
Artifacts, Primary Sources
Date Posted:
3/10/2009
A popular portrait method of photography from the 1839 announcement of its invention to about 1860, the Daguerreotype was a unique photograph with no negative—each photograph was exposed on a copper plate coated with silver-nitrate. This half-length Daguerreotype portrait of Louis Jacques Mand
Grade Range:
K-12
Resource Type(s):
Artifacts, Primary Sources
Date Posted:
3/10/2009
Believed to be the first photographic portrait made in the United States, this portrait of Dorothy Catherine Draper was originally taken by her brother Dr. John W. Draper (1811-1882) in his Washington Square studio at the New York University in 1839 or 1840, within the first year of Louis Jacques
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