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Grade Range:
K-12
Resource Type(s):
Artifacts
Date Posted:
3/1/2018
Originally a bakery or milk delivery wagon, tradition says that Lucy Stone used it at speaking engagements and to distribute the Woman's Journal. Around 1912 suffragists found the wagon in a barn on Stone's property. They painted it with slogans and continued to use it to sell the Woman's Journal
Grade Range:
K-12
Resource Type(s):
Interactives & Media
Date Posted:
9/4/2020
Winning voting rights was a job so big that no woman could do it alone. The Smithsonian American Women’s History Initiative explores stories of diverse communities and their early contributions to the fight for women’s suffrage. Learn more women’s history with the Smithsonian: https://womenshi
Grade Range:
K-12
Resource Type(s):
Reviewed Websites
Date Posted:
5/4/2021
Whether you're a student, teacher or family, visiting the Capitol is a great way to explore the roots of our country's government through stories and hands-on activities. Visitors can choose from a variety of lessons about Congress and the Capitol that go beyond the traditional Capitol tour. The
Grade Range:
K-12
Resource Type(s):
Artifacts, Primary Sources
Date Posted:
1/29/2009
Arthur Ashe (1943-1993) bought this Head tennis racket in 1975 and used it in competitions including Wimbledon and the Davis Cup. When he began his career in 1955, he was challenged by racial prejudice. But the young man from Richmond. Virginia, broke down these barriers, becoming a Grand Slam to
Grade Range:
K-12
Resource Type(s):
Artifacts, Primary Sources
Date Posted:
9/20/2009
Mariachis, groups comprised of vocalists, trumpeters, violinists, and various bass and guitar players, are today considered Mexico's traditional musical ensemble. Originally from the state of Jalisco, mariachi music transformed itself from a regional to a national music between the 1930s and 1950
Grade Range:
K-12
Resource Type(s):
Artifacts, Primary Sources
Date Posted:
12/18/2008
This is a Bata Cubana, or Cuban Rumba dress, donated to the Smithsonian by Celia Cruz, the great Cuban salsa singer in 1997. An adaptation of the traditional Cuban rumba dress, it was made in the United States by Cuban-born designer José Arteaga. The Bata Cubana has its roots in the 19th century
Grade Range:
K-12
Resource Type(s):
Artifacts, Primary Sources
Date Posted:
11/10/2008
The ENIAC was a large, general-purpose digital computer built to compute ballistics tables for U.S. Army artillery during World War II. Occupying a room 30 feet by 50 feet, ENIAC—the Electrical Numerical Integrator and Computer—weighed 30 tons and used some 18,000 vacuum tubes. It could compu
Grade Range:
K-12
Resource Type(s):
Artifacts, Primary Sources
Date Posted:
11/10/2008
While leg makeup has been commercially available since the 1920s, it wasn't until rationing was introduced during the World War II that the product became an essential commodity for many American women. Unable to procure silk or nylon hose, many women resorted to painting their legs with products
Grade Range:
K-12
Resource Type(s):
Reviewed Websites
Date Posted:
6/11/2008
Construction of the National Japanese American Memorial on Federal land was authorized by statute (PL 102-502) and signed into law by President George Bush on October 24, 1992. Initially intended to commemorate Japanese American War veterans, the purpose has been extended to honor the patriotism
Grade Range:
K-12
Resource Type(s):
Reference Materials
Date Posted:
7/7/2008
This list of web resources compiled by the National Museum of American History contains links to websites that are related to the Brown v. Board of Education decision.  It is included in the online exhibition entitled Separate is Not Equal: Brown v. Board of Education.
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