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Grade Range:
K-12
Resource Type(s):
Reference Materials
Date Posted:
6/17/2009
Winter counts are calendars that the Lakota used to mark the passage of time. This online exhibition features a searchable database of Smithsonian winter count images, a documentary about Lakota history and culture and video interviews with Lakota people Through the use of this website, Students
Grade Range:
K-12
Resource Type(s):
Artifacts, Primary Sources
Date Posted:
9/19/2009
In Puerto Rico, the traditional center of lace making is the town of Moca. There, lace is made by hand on bobbins and is known as mundillo. Bobbin lace is a complicated process of weaving together different spools of thread held in place by pins. Lace making today is undergoing a resurgence of po
Grade Range:
K-12
Resource Type(s):
Artifacts, Primary Sources
Date Posted:
3/5/2009
This embroidered mourning picture was embroidered in Lititz, Pennsylvania, about 1816, using silk thread, silk chenille, gold spangles, watercolor, and ink on silk fabric. In a gilded wood frame, it measured 25" x 25", and its black mat is reverse-painted on the glass. Mourning designs appear in
Grade Range:
K-12
Resource Type(s):
Lessons & Activities
Date Posted:
9/4/2012
This “getting to know you” activity asks kids to show who they are by composing a portrait made of their objects. It also introduces or reinforces an idea central to historical research—objects hold stories about the people who own them and when they lived. This activity suite is desig
Grade Range:
K-12
Resource Type(s):
Artifacts, Primary Sources
Date Posted:
6/19/2012
While training for combat on the fields of Yale University in 1917, Private J. Robert Conroy found a brindle puppy with a short tail. He named him Stubby, and soon the dog became the mascot of the 102nd Infantry, 26th Yankee Division. He learned the bugle calls, the drills, and even a modified do
Grade Range:
K-12
Resource Type(s):
Artifacts, Primary Sources
Date Posted:
9/17/2010
"I want to talk for a few minutes with the people of the United States about banking." So began on March 12, 1933, the first of about thirty informal "Fireside Chat" addresses that President Franklin D. Roosevelt would deliver over the radio. His ability to communicate over this new medium direct
Grade Range:
K-12
Resource Type(s):
Reference Materials, Interactives & Media
Date Posted:
4/21/2020
This exhibition is about Clotilde Arias, a Peruvian immigrant who came to New York City in 1923 at age twenty-two to study music. Decades later she translated the national anthem into the official Spanish version at the request of the U.S. government. Arias died in 1959 in Manhattan at age fifty-eig
Grade Range:
K-12
Resource Type(s):
Artifacts, Primary Sources
Date Posted:
9/3/2020
The Quakers published this booklet titled "El Obrero y sus Derechos" in 1981. The 23-page Spanish language booklet uses cartoons to inform and instruct workers on their rights and where to go for help. It covers a wide variety of occupations (apparel, agriculture, construction, car washing, etc.) Th
Grade Range:
K-12
Resource Type(s):
Artifacts, Primary Sources
Date Posted:
12/30/2009
General Charles Conrwallis was so mortified by his defeat that he dispatched his second-in-command, Brigadier General Charles O'Hara, to surrender his forces. When O'Hara offered Cornwallis's sword to George Washington, Washington, in keeping with the rigid hierarchies of military protocol, asked
Grade Range:
K-12
Resource Type(s):
Artifacts, Primary Sources
Date Posted:
2/19/2009
This homemade costume was made for the Ponce carnival. It has a cape attached at the neck made from the same black and red striped fabric (black and red are the colors of the city of Ponce). Carnival participants who wear costumes like this one, in addition to a mask, and other carnival accoutrem
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