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Grade Range:
K-12
Resource Type(s):
Reviewed Websites
Date Posted:
6/11/2008
The Japanese American Citizens League (JACL) is a membership organization whose mission is to secure and maintain the human and civil rights of Americans of Japanese ancestry and others victimized by injustice. The JACL has 112 chapters nationwide and eight regional districts with over 24,000 mem
Grade Range:
K-12
Resource Type(s):
Artifacts, Primary Sources
Date Posted:
11/10/2010
Edwin McMillan shared the 1951 Nobel Prize in Chemistry with Glenn Seaborg. McMillan discovered element 93, or neptunium, in 1940 while working on the world's largest cyclotron at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Seaborg's discovery of element 94, or plutonium, was based on McMillan's
Grade Range:
K-12
Resource Type(s):
Reviewed Websites
Date Posted:
10/7/2008
POTUS.com consists of detailed biographies of every president from George Washington to George W. Bush. Each president has a comprehensive individual section devoted to them specifically. In each section teachers and students can find a great deal of information about the [residents, inc
Grade Range:
K-12
Resource Type(s):
Artifacts, Primary Sources
Date Posted:
12/13/2010
This Smith & Wesson was found loaded at the Little Big Horn Battlefield in 1883. The Smith & Wesson Schofield revolver, .45 caliber, was manufactured from 1875 to 1878. The vast majority of the 9,000 guns went to the U.S. Army. Many saw service in the Indian Wars, though th
Grade Range:
K-12
Resource Type(s):
Artifacts
Date Posted:
4/7/2016
Originally sold in 2001 by Apple Inc. as a portable music player exclusively for Macintosh’s operating system, the iPod’s market share began to grow as it included Windows operability in 2002 and introduced its iTunes Store in 2003. In June of 2004 this fourth generation iPod was announced, n
Grade Range:
K-12
Resource Type(s):
Interactives & Media
Date Posted:
9/15/2017
The Smithsonian's National Museum of American History presents a filmed version of its on-the-floor program, Meet the Wheelwoman. In this film, you’ll hear from a wheelwoman—a female bicycle rider from the 1890s—and learn about how women of that era used bicycles to change their l
Grade Range:
K-12
Resource Type(s):
Artifacts, Primary Sources
Date Posted:
9/3/2020
The most basic right of citizenship has been equal access and protection under the law. The fight to extend this right to all began before the Declaration of Independence proclaimed “all men are created equal,” and continues today.
Grade Range:
K-12
Resource Type(s):
Artifacts, Primary Sources
Date Posted:
9/17/2010
At six feet four inches tall, Lincoln towered over most of his contemporaries. He chose to stand out even more by wearing high top hats. He acquired this hat from J. Y. Davis, a Washington hat maker. Lincoln had the black silk mourning band added in remembrance of his son Willie. No one knows whe
Grade Range:
K-12
Resource Type(s):
Artifacts, Primary Sources
Date Posted:
11/4/2008
After graduating from the University of Wisconsin, Charles W. Hart and Charles H. Parr developed a two-cylinder gasoline engine and set up their business in Charles City, Iowa. In 1903 the firm built fifteen tractors (a term coined by Hart and Parr), and the 14,000 pound #3 is the oldest survivin
Grade Range:
K-12
Resource Type(s):
Artifacts, Primary Sources
Date Posted:
9/17/2009
La Malinche, the title of this lithograph, was the indigenous woman who translated for Cortés between Maya, Náhuatl, and Spanish during his first years in Mexico. Considered either as a traitor or a founding mother by some Mexicans, La Malinche was Cortés' lover and the mother of his
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