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History Explorer Results (1260)
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Grade Range:
K-12
Resource Type(s):
Artifacts, Primary Sources
Date Posted:
9/2/2020
The TV dinner represented a change in the way Americans were thinking about food. Introduced in 1954 by Swanson & Sons, of Omaha, Nebraska, it offered women--more and more of whom were working outside the home but still assumed to be responsible for cooking--an alternative to time-consuming meal pre
Grade Range:
K-12
Resource Type(s):
Artifacts, Primary Sources
Date Posted:
9/3/2020
The Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 prevented all but a few Chinese to enter the United States legally. In 1906, a major earthquake and resulting fire in San Francisco destroyed public records, allowing many Chinese to claim that they had been born in San Francisco. These men, with newly established c
Grade Range:
K-12
Resource Type(s):
Artifacts, Primary Sources
Date Posted:
5/14/2009
Acupuncture has gone in and out of fashion over the centuries in both China and the West. Part of a 2,000-year-old system of medicine that originated in China, acupuncture spread across Asia and the world with the migration of Asian peoples. In 2002, there were about 15,000 licensed acupuncturist
Grade Range:
K-12
Resource Type(s):
Reviewed Websites
Date Posted:
6/11/2008
The mission of the Asian American Curriculum Project is to educate the public about the great diversity of the Asian American experience by distributing books that foster cultural awareness and to educate Asian Americans about their own heritage. AACP believes that the knowledge which comes from
Grade Range:
K-12
Resource Type(s):
Artifacts, Primary Sources
Date Posted:
5/6/2010
This sign was purchased by a North Beach second-hand shop from a proprietor in the neighboring Chinatown district of San Francisco. It is said to date from between 1890 and 1910. If that is so, the sign’s survival is quite miraculous: The 1906 earthquake in April of that year caused much damage
Grade Range:
K-12
Resource Type(s):
Reviewed Websites
Date Posted:
10/23/2008
Discover America's favorite pastimes, sports and hobbies through the use of brief articles, images, video and audio clips, trivia questions and an interactive game entitled "Batter Up." Students will gain a unique perspective of American history by using this resource from the Library of Con
Grade Range:
K-12
Resource Type(s):
Reviewed Websites
Date Posted:
6/11/2008
The mission of the Hirasaki National Resource Center at the Japanese American National Museum is to provide access to the Museum's diverse collections related to Japanese Americans. The National Resource Center develops a collection of secondary materials that document the Japanese American exper
Grade Range:
K-12
Resource Type(s):
Artifacts, Primary Sources
Date Posted:
10/27/2008
Though anchored in local Roman Catholic traditions, many of the religious beliefs and symbols of Mexican Americans have roots in indigenous notions about the soul and our universe. Between October 31st and November 2nd, Día de los Muertos, or Day of the Dead, is celebrated with family, decoratin
Grade Range:
K-12
Resource Type(s):
Artifacts, Primary Sources
Date Posted:
9/29/2008
This hand-modeled and molded, unglazed red earthenware pitcher honors Frederick Douglass, "Slave Orator/ United States Marshall, Recorder of Deeds D.C./ Diplomat."
Grade Range:
K-12
Resource Type(s):
Artifacts, Primary Sources
Date Posted:
10/27/2008
This spur, worn over a riding boot, was made in Mexico in the mid-1800s. Rubbed against the animal's side, spurs are one of the instruments that riders use to direct horses. The spikes on this spur are set on a small wheel called a rowel, making this a rowel spur. Horses and good riding equipment
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