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History Explorer Results (1131)
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Grade Range:
K-12
Resource Type(s):
Artifacts, Primary Sources
Date Posted:
9/17/2009
This large, hand-held drum, known in Puerto Rico as a pandereta, is an essential instrument in the musical genre known as plena. The plena was developed by agricultural workers at the end of the 19th century on the southern coast of the island, around the city of Ponce. Consider
Grade Range:
K-12
Resource Type(s):
Artifacts, Primary Sources
Date Posted:
9/3/2008
The short-handled hoe brings back memories of back-breaking labor for generations of Mexican and Mexican American migrant workers who sustained California's booming agricultural economy.
Grade Range:
K-12
Resource Type(s):
Artifacts, Primary Sources
Date Posted:
10/19/2009
In 1848, the largest single gold rush in history was just getting under way in California.  The event triggered a mass migration of fortune hunters from around the world.  The territory has only recently passed into American hands as an outcome of U.S. victory in the Mexican War. 
Grade Range:
K-12
Resource Type(s):
Artifacts
Date Posted:
4/4/2016
This is a trading post booth number 13 from the New York Stock Exchange built in 1930. Trading was conducted in front of posts connected to the stock ticker by pneumatic tubes. Floor brokers buy and sell shares, attempting to get their customers the best price. Each stock is represented by a spec
Grade Range:
K-12
Resource Type(s):
Artifacts
Date Posted:
2/1/2017
The Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History recently acquired at auction a rare 18th-century silver milk pot or creamer with engraved with symbols and an inscription that support the American colonists’ ongoing boycott of imported goods, especially tea, during the months following a
Grade Range:
K-12
Resource Type(s):
Artifacts
Date Posted:
4/16/2018
This rare silk banner was probably carried in a public parade in Philadelphia in the mid to late 1790s. Its elaborate design suggests the importance of such festivals, which provided a place for many Americans, voters and non-voters, to express patriotic sentiments or partisan views on current ev
Grade Range:
K-12
Resource Type(s):
Artifacts, Primary Sources
Date Posted:
9/2/2020
The TV dinner represented a change in the way Americans were thinking about food. Introduced in 1954 by Swanson & Sons, of Omaha, Nebraska, it offered women--more and more of whom were working outside the home but still assumed to be responsible for cooking--an alternative to time-consuming meal pre
Grade Range:
K-12
Resource Type(s):
Artifacts, Primary Sources
Date Posted:
9/3/2020
The Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 prevented all but a few Chinese to enter the United States legally. In 1906, a major earthquake and resulting fire in San Francisco destroyed public records, allowing many Chinese to claim that they had been born in San Francisco. These men, with newly established c
Grade Range:
K-12
Resource Type(s):
Artifacts, Primary Sources
Date Posted:
7/8/2008
The Apple Macintosh introduced a graphic user interface (GUI) to the Apple line of computers. The idea had originated at Xerox's Palo Alto Research Center in the 1970s, but Xerox was slow to commercialize it. Apple proved far more successful when it introduced the Macintosh in January 1984, with
Grade Range:
K-12
Resource Type(s):
Artifacts, Primary Sources
Date Posted:
12/31/2010
Cher Ami was a registered Black Check cock carrier pigeon, one of 600 birds owned and flown by the U.S. Army Signal Corps in France during World War I. He delivered twelve important messages within the American sector at Verdun; on his last mission, October 4, 1918, he was shot through the breast
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