Museum Artifacts

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Grade Range:
K-12
Resource Type(s):
Artifacts
Date Posted:
4/7/2016
In 1851 Isaac Merritt Singer formed the I.M. Singer & Company (later the Singer Sewing Machine Company) after inventing his own sewing machine to remedy a flaw he noticed with traditional models. This Singer 24 chain stitch sewing machine was manufactured in 1910, and used in t
Grade Range:
K-12
Resource Type(s):
Artifacts, Primary Sources
Date Posted:
11/5/2008
From the 1920s, psychologists have explored ways to automate teaching. In the 1950s, the psychologist B. F. Skinner of Harvard University suggested that techniques he had developed for training rats and pigeons might be adopted for teaching humans.
Grade Range:
K-12
Resource Type(s):
Artifacts, Primary Sources
Date Posted:
1/27/2009
In the 15th century, decades before they sailed into the Caribbean, Spanish merchants, captains, and adventurers had already conquered and enslaved the people of the Canary Islands in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. On the western coast of continental Africa, the Portuguese had been cultivating a sla
Grade Range:
K-12
Resource Type(s):
Artifacts, Primary Sources
Date Posted:
12/13/2010
This Smith & Wesson was found loaded at the Little Big Horn Battlefield in 1883. The Smith & Wesson Schofield revolver, .45 caliber, was manufactured from 1875 to 1878. The vast majority of the 9,000 guns went to the U.S. Army. Many saw service in the Indian Wars, though th
Grade Range:
K-12
Resource Type(s):
Artifacts, Primary Sources
Date Posted:
11/5/2008
Religion has an essential role in military history, which is reflected in military material. Steel-covered New Testaments were popular keepsake gifts for soldiers going off to fight in World War II. Advertised in newspapers and magazines as protection from bullets, the small books were designed t
Grade Range:
K-12
Resource Type(s):
Artifacts
Date Posted:
4/7/2016
This Sony "Walkman" portable tape player dates from the early 1980s. Originally introduced in 1979 as the “Soundabout,” two people could listen simultaneously while a small microphone permitted them to converse without removing their headsets. Powered by a 9-volt battery, the recorder sold we
Grade Range:
K-12
Resource Type(s):
Artifacts, Primary Sources
Date Posted:
3/22/2012
Born in New Orleans in 1901, jazz musician Louis Armstrong (d. 1971)was known for his distinctive trumpet-playing and vocal style. He often improvised jazz riffs using his voice rather than his instrument, “scatting” notes and melodies rather than singing actual words. Armstrong transformed t
Grade Range:
5-12
Resource Type(s):
Artifacts, Primary Sources
Date Posted:
6/10/2009
By the late 19th century, the United States had established itself as a world leader in the area of civil engineering. Perhaps no project better symbolized America's technical prowess than the awe-inspiring Brooklyn Bridge, which connected the nation's largest and third largest cities—New York
Grade Range:
K-12
Resource Type(s):
Artifacts, Primary Sources
Date Posted:
12/17/2010
Physical Description Large yellow stripe with anchor and coat of arms. Red stripes on either side of yellow. Specific History Spanish admiral’s flag captured by United States gunboat Petrel from the cruiser Isla de Luzon during the Battle of Manila
Grade Range:
K-12
Resource Type(s):
Artifacts
Date Posted:
3/5/2009
Spinning wheels are believed to have originated in India between 500 and 1000 A.D. By the 13th century, they were seen in Europe, and were a standard piece of equipment for those making fiber into yarn. By the 17th century they were commonly found in homes in the colonies of North America.
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